Attack Dribble: Post Slides Implementation Plan (Part)

This entry is part 17 of 24 in the series Dribbling Actions

A.  2 players 1 action

In this building block, players will already be located in the post area. This building block should not be limited to post players.  Perimeter players should see this as an opportunity to work on their midrange game as well as finishing moves. Players will probably pick up on this action quickly in this breakdown.  It is in the combination of the layers where players need extra repetition.  However, they must understand the basic movement before they are ready for the combination of movements.

There are a couple combinations that coaches may decide not to drill and replace with  different actions.  One action is if a player is in the high post and the ball handler decides to attack in the direction of the high post player.  Following post slides, this player would move towards the short corner.  However, the coach may decide to have this player Circle Move, use the high post player as a pick and roll opportunity, or make this a Dribble-At action, all of which will be described later.  If any of these are the coach’s desired approach, they will be covered in an upcoming section and should not be drilled at this time. Coaches could teach that this would be a poor time to drive and discourage it from occurring completely.

B. 2 offensive players 2 actions

Locate 2 players on the perimeter in any two spots.  The attacker executes any attacking action.  After they pass, the receiver now becomes the attacker and must execute another attacking action.  The cutter must react appropriately to this action in order to satisfy post slides.

                              

 

C. 2 offensive players 1 defender 1 action

This building block can be used in a way similar to the Circle Movement building block. Coaches may want to use it to train the ball handler on how to deliver the pass.

However, when it comes to defending post slides specifically, coaches may decide this is something to skip and avoid all together. I would have to think carefully before I used this drill to train defense. I know that if we have to help with our post players in the lane, we’re really in trouble. We never want it to get to that point. Should we train it anyway?  In a situation where time is limited, I would choose to skip this block and work on keeping the ball out of the lane.

C. 2 offensive players 2 defender 1 action

If we aren’t going to spend much time with 1 defender, I’m not inclined to spend time with 2.  Next….

D. 3 offensive players 2 or 3 actions

The next logical offensive progression is to add another offensive player to the court.  The drill runs exactly the same as the last drill with each player following the rules that have been drilled previously.  This now gives the second attacker an option after they make their attack. A third action can be added in this drill as well, but in this case the second attacker should pass to the perimeter player instead of the player who executed the post slide. This should create a scenario for two players to react to an attack dribble from the post.

E.  3 offensive players 1, 2 or 3 defenders

Again, if coaches want to take this opportunity to go back to the Attack Dribble Building Blocks and work on any of the offensive or defensive parts of this layer, that is fine. However, I haven’t found much value yet in drilling defensive reactions to a post reacting to the dribble.

F.  4 offensive players 2 actions

This is getting pretty boring.  All of these breakdowns start with Circle Movement building blocks. It’s all the same stuff.  Do I really need to go on? At this point, players have been taught how to react to dribble penetration anywhere on the court. It’s only a matter of it becoming habitual.

As much as I love it when our players attack the basket, I’m getting tired of talking about it. We’re so close to doing some pretty cool stuff.  Maybe I’ll come back to this at some point but for now, I think you all get it by now and I want to take this in another direction.

If you want more about basic post slides let me know.

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9 thoughts on “Attack Dribble: Post Slides Implementation Plan (Part)

  1. [...] DRIVE ADJUSTMENT: WHOLE  |  PART  |  WHOLE WHERE DO I GO? POST SLIDES:  WHOLE  |  PART  | ... hoopscollege.com/blog/rr-attack-dribble-circle-movement-baseline-drive-adjustment-description
  2. [...] DRIVE ADJUSTMENT: WHOLE  |  PART  |  WHOLE WHERE DO I GO? POST SLIDES:  WHOLE  |  PART  |  ... hoopscollege.com/blog/rr-attack-dribble-offensive-fundamentals
  3. [...] DRIVE ADJUSTMENT:  WHOLE  |  PART  |  WHOLE WHERE DO I GO? POST SLIDES:  WHOLE  |  PART  | ... hoopscollege.com/blog/rr-attack-dribble-circle-movement-description
  4. [...] DRIVE ADJUSTMENT:  WHOLE  |  PART  |  WHOLE WHERE DO I GO? POST SLIDES:  WHOLE  |  PART  | ... hoopscollege.com/blog/rr-attack-dribble-baseline-drive-adjustment-whole
  5. [...] DRIVE ADJUSTMENT: WHOLE  |  PART  |  WHOLE WHERE DO I GO? POST SLIDES:  WHOLE  |  PART  | ... hoopscollege.com/blog/rr-attack-dribble-baseline-drive-adjustment-description
  6. [...] DRIVE ADJUSTMENT:  WHOLE  |  PART  |  WHOLE WHERE DO I GO? POST SLIDES:  WHOLE  |  PART  | ... hoopscollege.com/blog/rr-attack-dribble-baseline-drive-adjustment-where-do-i-go
  7. [...] DRIVE ADJUSTMENT:  WHOLE  |  PART  |  WHOLE WHERE DO I GO? POST SLIDES:  WHOLE  |  PART  | ... hoopscollege.com/blog/rr-attack-dribble-baseline-drive-adjustment-part
  8. [...] DRIVE ADJUSTMENT:  WHOLE  |  PART  |  WHOLE WHERE DO I GO? POST SLIDES:  WHOLE  |  PART  | ... hoopscollege.com/blog/rr-attack-dribble-baseline-drive-adjustment-whole-2
  9. [...] DRIVE ADJUSTMENT:  WHOLE  |  PART  |  WHOLE WHERE DO I GO? POST SLIDES:  WHOLE  |  PART  | ... hoopscollege.com/blog/rr-attack-dribble-post-slides-implementation-plan-whole-i

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