Dribble-At: Whole (Combining Layers Offensively)

This entry is part 22 of 24 in the series Dribbling Actions

Players will now be able to combine two truly “different” layers. Even when different layers were introduced with the Attack Dribble, each of these layers were initiated by someone attacking the basket.  The only real choice that the ball handler had in initiating an action was whether they attacked left or right. Now the ball handler will be able to either Attack or Dribble-At.  Offensive players without the ball must react beyond a right or left rotation.  They must recognize the Dribble-At and make a straight basket cut. A common mistake is for players to begin to rotate on a Dribble-At and round off their backdoor cut.

With the ability to combine layers, the possibilities and combinations for drills grow exponentially.  The opportunities to repeat the same fundamentals in drills that look and act different is nearly limitless.  It is only time and our own imaginations that limit our ability to provide consistently different drills to add variety and freshness to the repetition of a certain skill or concept.

This post will only address the offensive side of combining layers.  I will dedicate another post to adding defense in different ways to these layers.  There is no way that I will be able to cover every possible scenario. However, I think these two layers in and of themselves provide coaches the opportunity to teach a number of different defensive concepts.

I hope this will be the beginning of “Frankenstein”.  I would love for this to be the start of a monster that comes alive and generates numerous ideas for teaching the game. Obviously, as other layers are added, the monster will grow.  So be it.

KEEP IN MIND THAT PLAYERS ARE ONLY ALLOWED TO PASS TO PERIMETER PLAYERS IF THEY ATTACK!  IF THEY PASS TO A CUTTER OFF OF A DRIBBLE-AT, THIS SHOULD END THE DRILL.  COACHES MAY WANT TO TELL PLAYERS NOT TO PASS TO CUTTERS UNTIL THIS REACTION IS COVERED. 

GAME CLIPS ARE BELOW.  CLIPS FROM PRACTICE TO SHOW DRILLS ARE ON THE TO DO LIST.

A. 2 offensive players 1 action (Attack and Dribble-At)

The previous 1-action building blocks were used to teach the techniques and fundamentals of Dribble-At.  Once players can perform the skills necessary to execute this layer, they must be drilled on the quick read and reaction to the ball handler’s action.  The only way to teach this is to allow the ball handler to give the ball handler different options which forces the other players to react to those actions.

At this point, the ball handler has two options. These options should be drilled together to help train the reactions. Coaches should pick two adjacent spots.  The ball handler can attack in either direction or Dribble-At the receiver.  The receiver must react correctly.

Notice Post Slides are left out of this drill.  They require a post player or more than one action. However, Post Slides will be included as additional actions are added.

C. 3 offensive players 2 actions (Attack, Post Slides and Dribble-At)

This is similar to the previous 3 player 2 action drills in the Attack Dribble layers except now players have the option of using Dribble-At. Initially coaches might decide designate the order of the layers that players execute. They could say players should execute a Dribble-At followed by an Attack Dribble.  They could also specify that players must execute at least 1 Dribble-At action out of the 2. However, eventually players must be given the freedom to make their own decisions on which layers they execute. This is more game like for ball handlers as well as players without the ball who must learn to react to the ball handler and not to a coach’s parameters.

D. 4 offensive players 2 actions (Attack, Post Slides and Dribble-At)

Once 4 players are on the court, teams have the choice of having 3 perimeter players and 1 permanent post player, or just 4 perimeter players.  This is up to the coach, but both alignments are valuable if the team plans on playing with a post player at any point along the way.

E. 5 offensive players 2 or 3 actions (Attack, Post Slides and Dribble-At)

Teams can now complete the picture with everything they have so far. Coaches should designate the alignment that they prefer, but they can use whichever one they prefer. Initially, coaches can also designate which layers players must execute.  For example, they could say that players must execute at least 1 Attack action out of the 2 or that the first action must be a Dribble-At action.

However, players must be given the freedom to make their own decisions on which layers they execute at some point.  This is more game like for ball handlers as well as players without the ball who must learn to react to the ball handler and not to a coach’s parameters.

It is important to limit the number of actions initially so that players can build confidence in their ability to execute small numbers of actions.  As they become more proficient with 2 actions, additional actions can be added.

Because players are not allowed to pass to perimeter players except after an attack, it may be best to limit the number of actions at this point. Once players “know how” to pass to perimeter players and what they are supposed to do when they pass to these players, the number of actions with 5 players on the court is nearly endless.

Series Navigation<< Dribble-At: PartDribble-At: Defensive Points of Emphasis >>